Category Archives: Exhibitions

COSTUME COSTUME PHOTOS

The New York SOFA show was last weekend, and I was thrilled to have my work taken to the exhibit by Sienna Gallery and The Opulent Project. TOP organized a display called COSTUME COSTUME, which featured handmade contemporary jewelry by emerging artists who deal with the subject of adornment, costuming, and jewelry. TOP installed a photobooth in their space so that attendees of SOFA could don their favorite jewels and have their picture taken wearing them! I hear the lines were long for the photobooth, and that it was a ‘mindblowing‘ installation… Congratulation to The Opulent Project for having such a stimulating and successful exhibit!
I’ve selected some of my favorite photobooth photos of people wearing my work below. As I wasn’t able to get down to NYC this past weekend, it was great to be able to check out these images and to see people were enjoying themselves.







COSTUME COSTUME


I’m excited to be part of The Opulent Projects upcoming project, COSTUME COSTUME, which will be making it’s debut at Sienna Gallery’s booth at the NYC SOFA exhibit from April 14th through the 17th. I’m really excited to be part of such a fun and conceptual project that presents handmade, contemporary jewelry at an accessible price to young collectors.

COSTUME COSTUME is a collection of work made by emerging contemporary art jewelers. It is an exploration of costume jewelry as subject, jewelry about jewelry. You’ll find the COSTUME COSTUME show in the Sienna Gallery booth (#301), their installation includes a photo-booth where the guests are invited to document themselves wearing the opulent baubles that are part of the show.


Participating artists as of April 2011 Mikael Arsjö, Kate Bauman, Michael Dale Bernard, Thyra Bessette, Sarah Kate Burges, Erin Gardner, Anna Hinkes, Rory Hooper, Courtney Kemp, Julia Elizabeth Louise, Jimin Park, Mary Hallam Pearse, Earl Ross, Leslie Skalin, Theresa Sterner, Monika Strasser, Kristi Sword, Islay Taylor, Melissa Tolar, Ben Ulsh. Organized by Erin Gardner from The Opulent Project.

For the sake of Opulence…

I am flattered to have recently been asked by The Opulent Project to participate in one of their ongoing projects, COSTUME COSTUME. As a result, I’ve been working on making lots of the Pro Nailz pieces the past couple of weeks. As you can tell from the image to the right, I’ve logged many hours painting nails while watching hours of terrible movies. I can barely tell the difference between my living room and a professional nail salon at this point.


The exhibition that I’ve been making the work for, COSTUME COSTUME, investigates the nature and subject of costume jewelry… Costume jewelry has been traditionally viewed as a mass produced, low price point, fashionable yet disposable variety of jewelry. According to The Opulent Project, ‘the original intention of costume jewelry is not to become collectibles or heirlooms but to be fashionable and dispensable when the trend passes. Frequently this jewelry is a mimicry of existing unattainable luxury jewelry or simply of a notion of traditional jewelry.’


The goal of COSTUME COSTUME is to present the limited edition works of designers who have tweaked the identity of costume jewelry to address the conceptual issues associated with this genre of jewelry. The pieces that are represented in this show challenge concepts of value, material, historicism, and identity. ‘By replication and alteration we seek to further remove the simulated jewelry from its origin, thus costuming the costumed…. COSTUME COSTUME.’

I shipped the work that I’m contributing to COSTUME COSTUME out this morning to the ladies of The Opulent Project. It all fit into a small sized USPS priority rate box, which is always nice because the shipping rates are tolerable but also discouraging because it seems like so much artwork and labor should take up more physical space.

Check it out: COSTUME COSTUME will be exhibited with Sienna Gallery at SOFA NY in April 2011, and will then travel to the Heidi Lowe Gallery in August.

New Traditional Jewellery: True Colours

Though I don’t think that I’ll be able to make this exhibition, I wanted to share the information for this years New Traditional Jewellery showcase. The show is a biannual show which is hosted at the Museum voor Moderne Kunst Arnhem in the Netherlands. This years theme is True Colours, which is more than welcome as we exit the drab season of winter and begin to look for the colorful signs of spring.

Some of my favorites are pictured here:
The top image is a necklace by Tamara Gruner. I appreciate her monochromatic palate, and how the uniformity of the composition transforms the recycled materials into decorative objects that seem much more opulent than they are. The middle image is a necklace titled Show Me Colours 2010, by Denise Julia Reytan, and again features a composition of repurposed materials. The hyper saturation of the colors create a vibrancy that just makes my mouth water! Finally, the bottom image of the multi‐coloured Urban Tribal Necklace of Amanda Caines uses rejected telephone and computer wires made of plastic in bright colors, winding wool around them, fastens vintage fabrics to them and subsequently decorates them with beads.

Gah, I cannot wait for the catologue for this exhibition to come out!
Here is the mission statement for the show:

New Traditional Jewellery is a bi-annual international design competition in the field of contemporary jewellery. Historical or ethnographical carriers of meaning are taken as an incentive to generate new forms. In addition to this general framework there is also a specific theme. After traditional costume, faith and intimacy, this year’s theme is ‘True Colours’. Literally this refers to colour, for example in relation to materials and pigments. Throughout the ages colours and materials, such as gold and silver, often determined the meaning and value of pieces of jewellery. In the 1970’s and ‘80s other materials, such as textiles and Perspex, were also used.

As a result there emerged a new ‘language of colours’. This was an important step in the emancipation of contemporary jewellery. Therefore, ‘True Colours’ is about the history, meaning, value, magic and power of colour. Figuratively speaking, ‘True Colours’ could also mean “showing your true colours” or ‘to unveil your true self’. In this sense the theme could be approached from a social point of view, in which today’s multicoloured society is the main focus of attention. Colour contains information about status and social position. Colour can shout, curse, emancipate, help, judge and segregate.

Colours is a statement.

Chromophilia Reviewed!

I’m excited to have Chromophilia get a review in one of our local papers, The Providence Phoenix. The article, by Greg Cook, highlights some of the work in the exhibition and touches upon the aesthetic of the show. Personally, I’m always so glad to have contemporary art jewelry written about, because it hardly ever happens and I appreciate that critics are willing to learn about this emerging field and present it to a larger audience. I’ve posted Greg’s review below, or you can read it here.

Review: ’10 Most Endangered Properties,’ plus ‘Chromophilia’

The title of the “Chromophilia” exhibit at Craftland (235 Westminster Street, Providence, through October 10) focuses our attention on the bright colors of contemporary studio jewelry, which follows the 1980s revival — a la American Apparel — throughout fashion. But the bigger trend that curators Devienna Anggraini and Islay Taylor identify is a Post-Modern, catholic use of a wide variety of non-precious materials.

Mike & Maaike, a San Francisco studio led by Mike Simonian and Maaike Evers, fashion flat leather necklaces and broaches based on pixilated photos of famous jewelry (Daisy Fellowe’s “Tutti Frutti” necklace, Imelda Marcos’s ruby necklace, the Hope Diamond) found via Google image searches. Mariana Acosta Contreras of Providence strings folded leather into scarf-like necklaces resembling strands of flowers or shelf mushrooms. They often have a neutral main color (gray, white) with bright hues (reds, greens) flaring from inside folds.

Islay Taylor of Providence crochets webs of thread to hold cascading strands of orange and red beads. San Francisco’s Emiko Oye turns Legos into bright, blocky, fun bracelets. One cheekily puns on Mondrian’s blocky early 20th-century abstractions. RISD-trained Jimin Park’s broaches look as if she’s fashioned bits of metal and fluorescent plastic junk she picked up off the street into Post-Modern tribal talismans. Oye and Park’s work highlights a distinguishing characteristic of this jewelry: a spirit of play.

Chromophilia Installation Photos

Here are some photographs from the installation of Chromophilia at Craftland. This show, which I co-curated with Devienna Anggraini, features the work of Emiko Oye, Anthony Tammaro, Mike and Maaike, Jimin Park, Jenny Bradley, Amy Weiks, and Mariana Acosta.

I have to say that the final display looks wonderful. The work really brightens up the gallery with the highly saturated hues and tactile materials that each artist used.
Enjoy the pictures, and if you want more information about the show or artists check out the Chromophilia blog!






TITLE WALL!

It’s Saturday night, and we just hung the final piece. (insert huge sigh of relief here) The artist reception is going to be next Thursday… And at the risk of seeming conceited, the show looks amazing and is totally worth fighting to find a parking space downtown in order to go to the opening.

It’s getting colorful at Chromophilia

Devienna and I met today to install our upcoming show, Chromophilia, at Craftland. It took us only six hours to get a majority of the work done, and I’m very pleased with the results! Devienna was the brave one climbing up and down the ladder all day, while I laid out and secured most of the work… Clearly, we were a perfect team, and I’m honestly shocked at how quickly we worked together. I felt like a jewelry-installing zombie towards the end, but it was worth it! So many mono-filament knots.

Now that all the work is laid out in the gallery, the chromatic theme of the show is becoming brazenly apparent. Craftlands gallery has been transformed into a prism of color, texture, and material. Saturated reverberations coming off each artists work and just light up the space. All of the jewelry looks compliments each other nicely, and there is a good balance of styles of making and materials also.

Here are some preview pictures of the exhibition from when we were setting up today. I’ll post more detailed images after the show opens.